After Earth: undeserving of it’s flop film status

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Sitting down to watch After Earth, I didn’t expect much. Having heard and read only negative feedback, I was prepared for the worst – a plodding adventure written by Will Smith (produced by him too) with the sole intention of raising his son Jaden to movie star status.

I was pleasantly surprised, therefore, to find myself drawn in by the suspense of this action-packed flick and not so pleasantly surprised to realize the majority of mainstream media were so obsessed with the fact Will Smith would have the audacity to costar with his son in a movie helmed by a “failed” director that they couldn’t just enjoy After Earth for what it is.

Prior to this, co-writer and director M. Night Shyamalan had been on a downward spiral that was seemingly out of control. After delivering a trio of great films – including The Sixth Sense – between 1999 and 2002, Shyamalan lost his footing and produced an unbroken string of bad movies. It is natural, I suppose, for one to expect that trend to continue. But it didn’t.

After Earth is not perfect, but it is Shyamalan’s best movie since 2002’s Signs. It is also a compelling science-fiction adventure that works as both a coming-of-age tale and a parable about father-son relationships.

The film is set in a distant future where human beings – having damaged Earth beyond repair – are living on a new world. During a routine military mission, a famous human general named Cypher Raige (Will Smith) and his 13-year-old boy, Kitai (Smith’s son, Jaden), crash land on the old human home world. Because Earth is unstable and populated by a host of deadly creatures, Kitai and Cypher are in remarkable danger.

As with a lot of semi-enjoyable science-fiction movies, After Earth has points that strain credibility. For instance, the characters possess only crude, close-range weapons despite being advanced enough for intergalactic travel. Focusing on this could ruin one’s appreciation for the picture. But beneath the surface-level problems lies a movie that is both action-packed and emotionally stirring.

Shyamalan does a fine job with pacing, and Will Smith is solid as a hardened military veteran who realizes that he and his son are facing long odds. Jaden Smith is less polished than his father, however, and he speaks in a poorly chosen (and never explained) accent. An annoying aspect, to be sure, but one easily ignored.

After Earth is a film that should have helped Shyamalan regain his stature in the film industry. Unfortunately, the early backlash was so nasty that it may have actually sped his fall. Definitely not out of this world, but an enjoyable film that by no mean deserves its bad reputation.

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Total Recall: slicker but soulless

Film Jam

By Kelly O’Brien

The latest movie remake to spring out of Hollywood in recent months, Total Recall boasts an all-star cast of Colin Farrell, Kate Beckinsale, Jessica Biel and Bryan Cranston. While this reboot, besed on the 1966 short story by Philip K. Dick, retains the original title from the cult classic 1990 Arnie movie, it seems to have borrowed pretty much everything else from the most successful action/sci-fi movies of the past decade. In other words, it’s nothing we haven’t seen before.

Directed by Len Wiseman of the Underworld films, Total Recall is not only fast-paced and adrenaline-pumping, it’s astonishingly well-made. On paper, it’s a box office smash of epic proportions. In reality, however, it’s just another in a long line of technically impressive yet ultimately forgettable action films.

In a dystopian future, the majority of earth’s landmass has been devastated by chemical warfare. Only two habitable areas remain…

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