Rust and Bone: A tough watch

Rust and Bone marks the return of Parisian film-maker Jacques Audiard. Much like his 2009 success A Prophet, this picture pushes viewers to the unpleasant extremes of reality whilst remaining rooted in the mundane. .

Party girl Stephanie (Marion Cotillard) meets security guard Ali (Matthias Schoenaerts) when she gets in a fight in a nightclub. She isn’t badly hurt but he drives her home anyway and they part ways. The next day, Stephanie returns to work at Marineland where she trains killer whales. Soon catastrophe strikes and Stephanie is pulled into the water and her legs are bitten off.

Wheelchair-bound, Stephanie becomes depressed and reclusive, but contacts Ali on a whim and begins a friendship with him. The ensuing romance, if that is the correct term for this complex relationship, stretches both characters beyond their limits. She may carry the obvious handicap but Ali is shown to be grievously emotionally disabled. Rarely has such an unsympathetic and flawed character led a film so convincingly.

A Hollywood version of this film could have been corny and soap-like, but Audiard’s characters are passionate and real, and the way that they are shot makes this story incredibly powerful.

The CGI special effects are stunning, appearing to erase Marion Cotillard’s legs as if by magic. These impressive techniques are mind-boggling; her legs aren’t tucked away by some clever camera angles, they’re simply gone.

The film also tackled the awkward subject of sex with amputees in an intimate no-nonsense way not usually seen on film. As in the recent French hit Untouchable, where a paralyzed man was sent on a blind date, Rust and Bone tenderly shows its characters’ healthy love lives despite their physical disability.

Marion Cotillard gives a staggeringly beautiful performance, giving emotional depth and veracity to the role. This is arguably her best since her Academy award-winning turn as Edith Piaf in La Vie en Rose (2007).

Jacques Audiard has fast become the World’s favourite French director. His previous features have been showered with awards, and Rust and Bone has now earned a selection of its own, recently winning the Best Film prize at the London Film Festival, and being nominated for the Palme D’Or earlier this year, too.

A tough and original watch.

Advertisements
Previous Post
Leave a comment

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: